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Savely Yefremov
Savely Yefremov

National Security Strategy And Strategic Defenc...


"Our outstanding service members and their families do everything that we ask of them and more," Austin said. "Doing right by them is a national security imperative, and it's a sacred trust. So, we're looking forward to working with Congress to secure on-time appropriations to finalize this year's National Defense Authorization Act, and to continue to implement this strategy."




National Security Strategy and Strategic Defenc...


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The National Defense Strategy (or NDS) is produced by the United States Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) and is signed by the United States Secretary of Defense as the United States Department of Defense's (DoD) capstone strategic guidance. The NDS translates and refines the National Security Strategy (NSS) (produced by the U.S. President's staff and signed by the President) into broad military guidance for military planning, military strategy, force posturing, force constructs, force modernization, etc. It is expected to be produced every four years and to be generally publicly available.[1] [2] [3][4][5] [6]


International strategic competition is on the rise. The US has adjusted its national security and defence strategies and adopted unilateral policies. It has provoked and intensified competition among major countries, significantly increased its defence expenditure, pushed for additional capacity in nuclear, outer space, cyber and missile defence, and undermined global strategic stability.


As an independent institution, we produce evidence-based research, publications and events on defence, security and international affairs to help build a safer UK and a more secure, equitable and stable world.


The subject I want to discuss with you, peace and national security, is both timely and important. Timely, because I've reached a decision which offers a new hope for our children in the 21st century, a decision I'll tell you about in a few minutes. And important because there's a very big decision that you must make for yourselves. This subject involves the most basic duty that any President and any people share, the duty to protect and strengthen the peace.


What seems to have been lost in all this debate is the simple truth of how a defense budget is arrived at. It isn't done by deciding to spend a certain number of dollars. Those loud voices that are occasionally heard charging that the Government is trying to solve a security problem by throwing money at it are nothing more than noise based on ignorance. We start by considering what must be done to maintain peace and review all the possible threats against our security. Then a strategy for strengthening peace and defending against those threats must be agreed upon. And, finally, our defense establishment must be evaluated to see what is necessary to protect against any or all of the potential threats. The cost of achieving these ends is totaled up, and the result is the budget for national defense.


This strategy of deterrence has not changed. It still works. But what it takes to maintain deterrence has changed. It took one kind of military force to deter an attack when we had far more nuclear weapons than any other power; it takes another kind now that the Soviets, for example, have enough accurate and powerful nuclear weapons to destroy virtually all of our missiles on the ground. Now, this is not to say that the Soviet Union is planning to make war on us. Nor do I believe a war is inevitable -- quite the contrary. But what must be recognized is that our security is based on being prepared to meet all threats.


Now, thus far tonight I've shared with you my thoughts on the problems of national security we must face together. My predecessors in the Oval Office have appeared before you on other occasions to describe the threat posed by Soviet power and have proposed steps to address that threat. But since the advent of nuclear weapons, those steps have been increasingly directed toward deterrence of aggression through the promise of retaliation.


What if free people could live secure in the knowledge that their security did not rest upon the threat of instant U.S. retaliation to deter a Soviet attack, that we could intercept and destroy strategic ballistic missiles before they reached our own soil or that of our allies?


The NDU College of Information and Cyberspace (CIC) educates and prepares selected military and civilian leaders and advisers to develop and implement cyberspace strategies, and to leverage information and technology to advance national and global security.


The mission of the College of International Security Affairs (CISA) is to educate joint warfighters, civilian national security leaders, and partner nation counterparts in critical thinking to inform national strategy and globally integrated operations, under conditions of disruptive change, to prevail across the continuum of competition and war, with a special emphasis on irregular warfare. CISA is the Department of Defense flagship for education and the building of partnership capacity in combating terrorism and irregular warfare at the strategic level. CISA prepares students for high-level policy and command and staff responsibilities through a graduate, interagency, and joint professional military education program.


The Eisenhower School (ES) prepares select military officers and civilians for strategic leadership and success in developing national security strategy and in evaluating, marshaling, and managing resources in the execution of that strategy.


Under the guidance of the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Eisenhower School Commandant and faculty prepare senior military officers, government civilians, and selected representatives from the private sector and international officers for the national security challenges of the 21st century. The goal is to leverage technological advances, integrate new strategic and operational concepts, identify and adapt to evolving global developments, and channel the vitality and innovation of the Services, the interagency, and allies to achieve a more seamless, coherent effect when confronting new national security challenges and the battlefields of the future.


The mission of the Joint Forces Staff College (JFSC) is to educate national security professionals to plan and execute operational-level joint, multinational, and interagency operations to instill a primary commitment to joint, multinational, and interagency teamwork, attitudes, and perspectives. Military operations increasingly require the Armed Services to work jointly and JFSC provides students the tools to operate in a joint environment.


The National War College (NWC) mission is to educate future leaders of the Armed Forces, Department of State, and other civilian agencies for high-level policy, command and staff responsibilities by conducting a senior-level course of study in national security strategy.The curriculum emphasizes the joint and interagency perspective. Reflecting this emphasis, 59 percent of the student body is composed of equal representation from the land, air, and sea (including Marine and Coast Guard) Services. The remaining 41 percent are drawn from the Department of State and other federal departments and agencies, and international fellows from a number of foreign countries.


With the increased dependence on digital and internet technologies, cyber security has come to be regarded as a national security issue, and the number of countries with a published cyber security strategy continues to rise. But these national cyber security strategies often run the risk of failing to address all the cyber security requirements of the many institutions within a given country, and the complex nature of the stakeholders involved and the networks formed by them means that the problem requires an interdisciplinary approach.


The job market needs highly skilled and educated national security professionals. Work in government, defense, international affairs, diplomacy and other areas. Serve in a variety of policy and field positions.


On December 16, 2022, a new National Security Strategy (PDF) and other strategy documents, basic policies on national security, were decided by the National Security Council and approved by the Cabinet Decision.


It is also through our armed forces that our country will be able to honour its international commitments, ensuring its allies can continue to rely on France in every situation, and to pursue its strategic partnerships in Africa, the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific.


The College of International Security Affairs is the Department of Defense flagship for education and building of partner capacity in combating terrorism, irregular warfare, and integrated deterrence at the strategic level.


The College of International Security Affairs is the Department of Defense flagship for education and the building of partner capacity in combating terrorism, irregular warfare, and integrated deterrence at the strategic level.


Our mission is to educate joint warfighters, civilian national security leaders, and partner nations in critical thinking to inform national strategy and globally integrated operations, under conditions of disruptive change, to prevail across the continuum of competition and war, with a special emphasis on irregular warfare.


Major Guy Herve Onambele Mendouga, CISA Class of 2022, tells his experience studying at the College of International Security Affairs (CISA), the U.S. Department of Defense flagship for education in combating terrorism, irregular warfare, and integrated deterrence at the strategic level.


Observers in the United States should draw three conclusions from this new NSS. First, Japan is indeed committing to its most meaningful boost in defense capabilities since the end of World War II. The three strategic documents identify and attempt to address deterrence gaps that have long plagued Japanese security. Until recently, Tokyo proved unwilling to fill these gaps themselves, preferring to depend on the United States as its security guarantor. For several reasons, including the fear of American disengagement and an increasingly harsh strategic environment, the era of dependence on the United States appears to be over. The Japanese government still wholeheartedly supports its alliance with the United States, yet is simultaneously seeking to couple that relationship with the development of indigenous capabilities. For example, just days after the release of the documents, Tokyo announced details on a set of new ballistic missile defense ships, which would provide defensive capabilities to intercept missiles launched from North Korea. Such developments should not be understood as Tokyo signaling mistrust for the alliance with the United States. Rather, Japanese leaders seek an alliance that minimizes dependence and brings in Tokyo as an equal partner. 041b061a72


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