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How Columbus Hindi Dubbed Movie Captivated Indian Audiences with its Beauty and Depth



Columbus Hindi Dubbed Movie: A Review




If you are looking for a movie that combines drama, romance, and architecture, you might want to check out Columbus, a 2017 American film that was dubbed in Hindi and released in 2020. The movie stars John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson as two strangers who bond over their shared interest in the modernist buildings of Columbus, Indiana. The movie is a slow-paced but captivating exploration of human emotions, relationships, and dreams, set against the backdrop of stunning architectural designs. In this article, we will review the plot, cast, themes, and reception of Columbus, and give you our opinion on whether it is worth watching or not.




Columbus hindi dubbed movie



Introduction




Columbus is a debut feature film by Kogonada, a Korean-American film critic and video essayist who is known for his analysis of directors like Stanley Kubrick and Yasujiro Ozu. The film premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival and was released in the United States on August 4, 2017. It received critical acclaim for its cinematography, performances, and screenplay, but had a limited box office success. In 2020, it was dubbed in Hindi and released in India by Dangal TV Channel, gaining popularity among Indian audiences who appreciated its aesthetic appeal and emotional depth.


The plot of Columbus follows Jin (John Cho), a Korean-American translator who travels to Columbus, Indiana to take care of his estranged father who has fallen into a coma while visiting the town as an architecture scholar. There he meets Casey (Haley Lu Richardson), a young library worker who loves architecture but has postponed her college plans to look after her mother who is a recovering drug addict. The two strike up a friendship as Casey shows Jin around her favorite buildings in Columbus, while also opening up about their personal lives and struggles. As they spend more time together, they develop feelings for each other, but also face difficult choices about their futures.


The main themes and messages of Columbus are related to architecture, family, identity, and passion. The movie explores how architecture can influence people's emotions, perspectives, and decisions, as well as how people can connect through their shared appreciation of beauty and art. The movie also examines how family ties can be both supportive and restrictive, how identity can be shaped by culture and environment, and how passion can be both inspiring and challenging. The movie ultimately celebrates the power of human connection and communication in overcoming obstacles and finding happiness.


The Architecture of Columbus




One of the most distinctive features of Columbus is its use of architecture as a visual motif and a narrative device. The movie showcases some of the most famous modernist buildings in Columbus, Indiana, which is a city that has been called "the Athens of the prairie" for its architectural heritage. Some of the buildings that are featured in the movie include: - The Miller House and Garden, designed by Eero Saarinen, Dan Kiley, and Alexander Girard, which is a masterpiece of mid-century modern design and a National Historic Landmark. - The North Christian Church, designed by Eero Saarinen, which is a hexagonal structure with a 192-foot spire and a circular sanctuary that seats 900 people. - The Cleo Rogers Memorial Library, designed by I.M. Pei, which is a geometric building that incorporates a large public plaza and a sculpture by Henry Moore. - The Irwin Union Bank, designed by Eero Saarinen, which is a glass-and-steel building that pioneered the concept of an open-plan office and a drive-through bank. The movie uses these buildings not only as scenic backdrops, but also as symbols of the characters' emotions and relationships. For example, the Miller House represents Jin's father's passion and legacy, but also his distance and neglect. The North Christian Church represents Casey's faith and hope, but also her doubt and guilt. The Library represents Jin and Casey's intellectual curiosity and mutual attraction, but also their different backgrounds and aspirations. The Bank represents Jin's career and ambition, but also his dissatisfaction and frustration. The movie also uses cinematography and sound to create a visual and auditory experience that complements the architecture. The movie employs long takes, static shots, symmetrical compositions, and natural lighting to highlight the beauty and harmony of the buildings. The movie also uses ambient sounds, such as birds chirping, cars passing, or water flowing, to create a sense of realism and contrast with the silence or dialogue of the characters. The movie also uses music sparingly, but effectively, to enhance the mood and emotion of certain scenes. For example, the movie uses classical music by Mozart and Beethoven to underscore the elegance and sophistication of the architecture, and indie music by Hammock and The xx to reflect the youthfulness and intimacy of the characters.


The Characters of Columbus




The other main attraction of Columbus is its portrayal of the two protagonists, Jin and Casey, who are both complex and relatable characters. Jin (John Cho) is a 40-year-old translator who lives in Seoul, South Korea. He has a successful career, but he is unhappy with his work and his personal life. He has a strained relationship with his father, who is a renowned architecture professor, but who has been absent and indifferent throughout Jin's life. He also has a girlfriend who is married to someone else, but who he does not love. He travels to Columbus to take care of his father who has fallen into a coma while giving a lecture at the university. He feels obligated to stay by his father's side, but he also resents him for his lack of affection and attention.


Casey (Haley Lu Richardson) is a 19-year-old library worker who lives in Columbus, Indiana. She has a passion for architecture, but she has postponed her college plans to stay with her mother, who is a recovering drug addict. She feels responsible for her mother's well-being, but she also longs for more opportunities and experiences outside of her hometown. She works at the library with her friend Gabriel (Rory Culkin), who has a crush on her, but who she does not reciprocate. She meets Jin when she overhears him talking on the phone outside the hospital where his father is admitted. She offers to show him around the town and its buildings, hoping to share her enthusiasm and knowledge with him.


Jin and Casey develop a friendship as they visit different buildings in Columbus and talk about their lives. They find out that they have some things in common, such as their love for architecture, their dissatisfaction with their current situations, and their desire for change. They also learn from each other's perspectives and experiences. Jin helps Casey realize that she has potential and talent, and that she should pursue her dreams and not sacrifice them for her mother. Casey helps Jin appreciate his father's work and legacy, and that he should forgive him and himself for their past mistakes. They also develop feelings for each other, but they are aware of their age difference, cultural difference, and personal circumstances.


Jin and Casey also deal with their family issues and personal dilemmas throughout the movie. Jin has to decide whether to stay in Columbus until his father wakes up or returns to Seoul where his work and girlfriend are waiting for him. He also has to confront his unresolved feelings towards his father and his role as a son. He also has to face his feelings for Casey and whether he wants to pursue a relationship with her or not. Casey has to decide whether to apply for college and leave Columbus or stay with her mother and continue working at the library. She also has to deal with her feelings for Jin and whether she wants to follow him or not. She also has to cope with her mother's relapse and recovery, and her role as a daughter. The movie does not provide easy answers or resolutions for these conflicts, but rather leaves them open-ended and ambiguous, allowing the viewers to interpret them according to their own preferences and expectations.


The Reception of Columbus




Columbus received mostly positive reviews from critics and audiences, who praised its visual style, acting, and writing. The movie has a 97% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 118 reviews, with an average rating of 8.1/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "Wonderfully acted and artfully composed, Columbus balances the clean lines of architecture against the messiness of love, with tenderly moving results." The movie also has a score of 89 out of 100 on Metacritic, based on 33 critics, indicating "universal acclaim". The movie was nominated for several awards, including the Independent Spirit Award for Best First Feature, the Gotham Independent Film Award for Best Actor (John Cho), and the National Board of Review Award for Top Ten Independent Films.


However, the movie also had some drawbacks and limitations. The movie had a low budget of $700,000 and a limited distribution, which affected its box office performance. The movie grossed only $1.1 million worldwide, making it a commercial failure. The movie also faced some criticism for its slow pace, lack of plot, and lack of diversity. Some viewers found the movie boring, pretentious, or unrealistic, and complained that nothing much happened in the story. Some viewers also questioned the representation of race and gender in the movie, and argued that the movie did not address the social and historical issues of Columbus, Indiana, such as its segregation, poverty, and drug problems.


The movie can be compared to other similar movies or genres, such as indie films, art films, or mumblecore films. Indie films are independent films that are produced outside of the major studio system, and often have low budgets, unknown actors, and unconventional narratives. Art films are films that focus on artistic expression rather than commercial appeal, and often have aesthetic qualities, symbolic meanings, and experimental techniques. Mumblecore films are a subgenre of indie films that feature naturalistic dialogue, improvised scenes, and amateur actors. Some examples of movies that are similar to Columbus are: - Lost in Translation (2003), directed by Sofia Coppola, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson as two Americans who form a bond in Tokyo. - Before Sunrise (1995), directed by Richard Linklater, starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy as two strangers who spend a night together in Vienna. - Paterson (2016), directed by Jim Jarmusch, starring Adam Driver and Golshifteh Farahani as a couple who live a simple life in Paterson, New Jersey. - Frances Ha (2012), directed by Noah Baumbach, starring Greta Gerwig as a young woman who struggles with her career and relationships in New York City.


Conclusion




In conclusion,Columbus is a movie that offers a unique and refreshing perspective on architecture, family, identity , and passion. The movie is a slow-paced but captivating exploration of human emotions, relationships, and dreams, set against the backdrop of stunning architectural designs. The movie features excellent performances by John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson, who play two strangers who bond over their shared interest in the modernist buildings of Columbus, Indiana. The movie also showcases the impressive cinematography, sound, and screenplay by Kogonada, who makes his debut as a feature film director. The movie received critical acclaim for its artistic merit, but had a limited box office success. The movie was dubbed in Hindi and released in India in 2020, gaining popularity among Indian audiences who appreciated its aesthetic appeal and emotional depth.


We recommend Columbus to anyone who enjoys indie films, art films, or mumblecore films, or who is interested in architecture, drama, or romance. The movie is not for everyone, as some might find it boring, pretentious, or unrealistic, but for those who appreciate its style and substance, it is a rewarding and memorable experience. We give Columbus a rating of 4 out of 5 stars, and we hope you will give it a try and let us know what you think.


Thank you for reading our review of Columbus. We hope you enjoyed it and learned something new. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to share them with us. We would love to hear from you.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about Columbus and our answers to them:


  • Q: Where can I watch Columbus?



  • A: You can watch Columbus on various online platforms, such as Amazon Prime Video, Netflix, YouTube, or Google Play. You can also buy or rent the DVD or Blu-ray from online or offline stores.



  • Q: Who is Kogonada and what are his other works?



  • A: Kogonada is a Korean-American film critic and video essayist who is known for his analysis of directors like Stanley Kubrick and Yasujiro Ozu. He has made several video essays for online platforms like Criterion Collection, Sight & Sound, and Film Comment. He has also written articles for magazines like The New Yorker and The Atlantic. Columbus is his first feature film as a director.



  • Q: What are some other movies that are similar to Columbus?



  • A: Some other movies that are similar to Columbus are Lost in Translation, Before Sunrise, Paterson, and Frances Ha. These movies are also indie films, art films, or mumblecore films that feature naturalistic dialogue, improvised scenes, and amateur actors. They also explore themes like culture, identity, passion, and connection.



  • Q: What are some of the best modernist buildings in Columbus, Indiana?



  • A: Some of the best modernist buildings in Columbus, Indiana are the Miller House and Garden, the North Christian Church, the Cleo Rogers Memorial Library, and the Irwin Union Bank. These buildings were designed by famous architects like Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, and Alexander Girard. They are examples of mid-century modern design that combine functionality and aesthetics.



  • Q: What are some of the benefits of watching movies in different languages?



  • A: Some of the benefits of watching movies in different languages are that you can learn new words and phrases, improve your listening and comprehension skills, expand your cultural knowledge and awareness, and enjoy different perspectives and expressions.



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